298- Conferencia La Vuelta al Mundo en 10 Años | CLUB DE CREATIVOS DE ESPAÑA

www.viajeros4x4x4.com

A fines de marzo de 2015 fuimos invitados a dar una conferencia sobre La Vida después de la Publicidad, mi antigua profesión, durante el encuentro anual del Club de Creativos de España.

Lo había hecho bien, me había ido bien. Entonces, ¿por qué dejar un trabajo bien pagado donde tenía el futuro asegurado?

Los primeros minutos son un poco enmarañados, ¡impresiona hablar a 500 personas!

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Aquí encontrarás otra conferencia que dimos en Madrid, para las Jornadas de los Grandes Viajes

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Consigue los libros de Pablo Rey sobre La Vuelta al Mundo en 10 Años en cualquier librería de España, en Amazon.com y en Kindle, o descarga las primeras historias en PDF.




287- Pablo Rey’s Favorite Travel Gear | OVERLAND JOURNAL MAGAZINE

www.viajeros4x4x4.com

Introduction written by Chris Collard. Published at Overland Journal Magazine, Gear Issue 2015. 

Four of the world’s most experienced overlanders share their top picks for don’t-leave-home-without-it gear.

Pablo Rey and his wife Anna live in a four-wheel drive Mitsubishi Delica L300, and I was anticipating they’d have a completely different set of favorites than Simon and Lisa from 2Ride the World, who “live” on a pair of BMW R1200GS bikes. Their responses, however, were somewhat of a revelation. That is, whether we live at home and travel when we can, or live on the road and shower when we can, there is a common thread. We covet gear that helps us eat, sleep, and communicate better – equipment that keeps us warm, protects our bodies, and gets us where we want to go. We also gain an emotional attachment to, and personify inanimate subjects of our affection. For example, to garner a name like La Cucaracha, Pablo Rey’s Delica L300 most assuredly played dead more than once. Or maybe it received this moniker because it has evolved over time and simply won’t die.

The rules were simple. Our chosen pros were limited to submitting the six items that rose to the top. I hope you enjoy the results.

© Pablo Rey

The Right Travel Partner

When you find the ideal partner to travel to the ends of the earth with, you have found the most difficult piece of gear of all to attain. While travelling alone can be enjoyable, it is always better when you can share the emotions and surprises of the road at the exact moment they occur. For me, that partner is Anna, a woman who doesn’t mind getting her hands dirty with motor oil, one that defends you in the midst of a fight, and knows how to repair a flat tire. Unfortunately, you won’t truly know if your partner has these qualities until you get on the road and things get difficult. If they do, you’ll know you’ve found the right travel companion. They will not only be your girl (or guy), but also your partner and pal.

La Cucaracha

On a long overland trip, your vehicle will adopt the personality of an extra team member. You talk to it, listen to it, pat it on the backdoor, and look after it when it gets sick. You’ll even find a slightly derisive nickname for it. After 14 years of  living adventures together over some of the worst roads on the planet, and sharing some of the most dreadful fuels, our 1991 Mitsubishi L300/Delica 4WD, which we call La Cucaracha, deserves our unconditional loyalty. Although I dream of never giving it up, I imagine that one day La Cucaracha will want to retire to the centre of a Spanish travel bar, like an old grandpa ready to share his overlanding stories to those who dream of starting their own trip of a lifetime.

Samsung Galaxy Tablet

Tablets are the Swiss knife of the modern traveler. With one 7-inch gadget as thin as half a paperback, you can access the Internet, listen to music, and travel with your own private library. You can watch movies, take pictures, find your GPS coordinates on an offline map, plan your next route, take notes and write stories, scan documents, find the cheapest fuel station near your location, play Pac-Man or Minecraft, watch TED presentations, download tutorials about how to play the harp, to identify trees and stars, and learn to tie knots like Popeye. It is impressive. We prefer the Samsung Galaxy tablets because we can add as much memory as needed with a micro SD card.

Espar Hydronic D5 SC

Cockroaches don’t like cold weather or altitude. To help ours overcome its rheumatism, last year we installed an Espar Hydronic D5 SC. This engine pre-heater is a truck driver’s favorite, perfect to warm the cabin in freezing temperatures and to avoid premature wear on the engine after many cold-weather starts. We also use it to have a hot shower every now and then. Although it was costly, it paid itself at the end of 2013 when the Arctic vortex hit us in Louisiana, leaving a thick coat of ice around the van. After 10 minutes running the Espar pre-heater the engine started as if we were on a warm beach in the Yucatan.

Pentaflon Ceramica

During the first 6 years of our trip around the world we had several severe breakdowns in remote places: in the Sudanese Sahara, 800 kilometers from a reliable mechanic (northern Kenya); at an elevation of 4,600 meters in the Bolivian Altiplano; and on a lost salt pan of the Chilean Andes. At the beginning of 2006 we installed a secondhand engine and started adding a dose of Pentaflon Ceramica every 20,000 km. I don’t know if it is magic or good luck, but this ceramic-Teflon miracle additive, which is manufactured in Spain, has protected our engine and helped to keep it healthy for the last 200,000 kilometers and three continents worth of bad roads. Additionally, since that time we haven’t had any serious oil leaks. For a long-haul overlander, that is a wonderful thing.

Swiss Army Water Bag

Switzerland might have one of the best-equipped armies in the world. The country is always politically neutral and their troops never go to war. Instead they invest their money testing and developing products than can be adapted to a traveler’s daily life. Their 20-litre rubber water bags are durable, can last for several years, don’t require installation, and have a hand hose attachment that can be used as a shower. Another bonus is that when they are empty they can be easily stored without taking up valuable room in your vehicle. We used our first one as an extra water reservoir while crossing Africa, and found our second bag in California. Not bad for 14 years on the road.

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Get the books of Pablo Rey about Around the World in 10 Years @ Amazon.com and Kindle, or download the first adventures HERE.




Bath Time | Pablo and Anna Comic Strip nº2

When you live on the road you always find new ways of doing things. Even at bath time | Cuando vives en la ruta siempre encuentras nuevas maneras de hacer las cosas. 

Frame 1, Anna: ‘Quiero que todo esté bien limpio.’

Frame 2, Pablo: ‘Bueno, creo que ya está.’

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Get the books about Pablo and Anna’s real stories on the road @ Amazon.com and Kindle, or download the first adventures HERE.

Follow the latest adventures of the real Pablo and Anna on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube @viajeros4x4x4

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On year 2000, Pablo Rey (Buenos Aires) and Anna Callau (Barcelona) quit their jobs and rented out their apartment in Spain to travel around the world during four years. Four somehow turned into fifteen. The couple, living out of their small 4WD van, a.k.a. La Cucaracha, has travelled more than 220,000 miles, passing through 60 countries, with no end in sight.

After leaving Southern Europe, these committed nomads have driven through the Middle East, Africa —from North to South, the entire American continent —from Tierra del Fuego (at the Southern tip of Patagonia) to the Arctic Ocean in Alaska, before settling in for a couple of years of discovery in North America. Getting here was no small feat. They crossed the Atlantic Ocean from South Africa to Argentina in a fishing vessel, survived elephant and Kalashnikov attacks in Africa and paddled down an Amazon river in a 6-log wooden raft. Their engine broke down in the middle of the Sudanese Sahara and froze at 15,000 feet during a very cold winter in the Bolivian Altiplano, and that’s just scratching the surface.

In 15 years they have met, shared food and stayed with some truly amazing and hospitable people. Whether in a house, hut, tent or under the stars, the take away is the same, in whatever culture, remove the dogma and indoctrination and you realize that we are all the same, one big human family living in a beautiful, albeit fragile, Earthly home.

Pablo has written three books in Spanish; one has been translated into English, Around the World in 10 Years: The Book of Independence, available at Kindle and Amazon.com. Download the first pages here!

Follow the latest adventures of the real Pablo and Anna on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube @viajeros4x4x4




The house of your dreams | Pablo and Anna Comic Strip nº1

How is the house of your dreams?

Sometimes breakdowns occur for a reason. Last August 2014 we were in the northern tip of Newfoundland, with a broken torsion bar in the land of very far away, when a guy arrived with his overloaded motorcycle. He was travelling from Washington D.C., and got surprised with our story of 14 years non-stop living in the road. We had dinner and he left the following day with a bug in his brain.

One month later he wrote to us with a brilliant idea: ‘everybody has done books and documentaries about travelling, but no one has ever done a comic strip. Would you be interested? I’ve read your books, and I’m sure you’ll have a lot of funny stories to share.’ We loved the idea.

He had a friend, a very good illustrator from Boston, and we started to have fun in very long Skype conversations.

9 months later we have the first Pablo and Anna Comic Strips. We would love to receive commentaries and, if you like them, share them!

All started with a crazy idea. Again.

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Get the books about Pablo and Anna’s real stories on the road @ Amazon.com and Kindle, or download the first adventures HERE.

Follow the latest adventures of the real Pablo and Anna on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube @viajeros4x4x4

•••••

On year 2000, Pablo Rey (Buenos Aires) and Anna Callau (Barcelona) quit their jobs and rented out their apartment in Spain to travel around the world during four years. Four somehow turned into fifteen. The couple, living out of their small 4WD van, a.k.a. La Cucaracha, has travelled more than 220,000 miles, passing through 60 countries, with no end in sight.

After leaving Southern Europe, these committed nomads have driven through the Middle East, Africa —from North to South, the entire American continent —from Tierra del Fuego (at the Southern tip of Patagonia) to the Arctic Ocean in Alaska, before settling in for a couple of years of discovery in North America. Getting here was no small feat. They crossed the Atlantic Ocean from South Africa to Argentina in a fishing vessel, survived elephant and Kalashnikov attacks in Africa and paddled down an Amazon river in a 6-log wooden raft. Their engine broke down in the middle of the Sudanese Sahara and froze at 15,000 feet during a very cold winter in the Bolivian Altiplano, and that’s just scratching the surface.

In 15 years they have met, shared food and stayed with some truly amazing and hospitable people. Whether in a house, hut, tent or under the stars, the take away is the same, in whatever culture, remove the dogma and indoctrination and you realize that we are all the same, one big human family living in a beautiful, albeit fragile, Earthly home.

Pablo has written three books in Spanish; one has been translated into English, Around the World in 10 Years: The Book of Independence, available at Kindle and Amazon.com. Download the first pages here!

Follow the latest adventures of the real Pablo and Anna on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube @viajeros4x4x4




284- Security on the Road: Wild encounters with the Police and the Army

Mexican military during a search in our 4wd van, La Cucaracha. Mexico

©Pablo Rey. Published on Overland Journal Magazine, Winter 2014.

After 15 years overlanding the world, Pablo Rey shares some important tips on how to not end up walking in your underwear on a faraway road in the middle of nowhere.

Fifteen years en route leaves you with a lot of stories about good and bad cops. We have been stopped many times by honest policemen doing their job, and very few times by policemen looking for a bribe to supplement their salary. When it happens, it becomes one of the most repeated topics after a long trip. Any hint of an African or Latin American jail is usually enough for most travelers to put a green note inside the passport and hand it to the policeman. And this is wrong. To bribe a cop to avoid a fine, fair or not, turns you into an accomplice.

Use your head. To avoid these uncomfortable situations the first thing we do is to follow all the rules of the country we visit. If you don’t know them, use common sense. If your vehicle was admitted into a country after being checked by police and customs agents, a bad cop can’t tell you that it is illegal to drive with tinted windows or that you can’t drive with a bull bar. Your vehicle was accepted into the country in that condition. Also, when you enter into a new country, try to get local insurance as fast as possible.

Wait it out. The second thing to do is to be aware that time is a traveler’s greatest asset. Corrupt cops want fast and easy money. If you don’t give them that, and instead you give them some chat, a cup of coffee, and you keep cool, after 20 minutes they will probably look for other prey. If they threaten you with prison, locking up your vehicle, or an array of other things to scare you just keep calm and smile. Sometimes it’s helpful to look like an idiot who doesn’t understand a word of what is being said.

Fake it. If the bad cop achieves his goal of scaring you, the best solution is to have some fake dollars at hand. Colombian fakes are really good and you can’t distinguish them by the naked eye. Bolivian fakes, which are usually burnt as an offering to the Pachamama ( Mother Earth) in rituals, are rougher, like those bearing a Marilyn Monroe image in Las Vegas. The reality, and a big plus, is that the officer will not count the notes in the middle of the road. He will probably put them into his pocket and wait for a happy, solitary moment. I would pay to see his face at that instant.

Make it. An International Driving Permit (IDP) is usually not compulsory, but it is accepted nearly everywhere in the world. It won’t hurt to hand a scanned, printed, and laminated copy (made with love at home) when a policeman asks about your documents. In Nicaragua, for example, the cops often keep your driving license until you pay the fine, real or invented, and an IDP would come in handy.

These are just some of the things we have learned over the last 15 years overlanding the world. If you ask me for a tip, just one, I would say: Be prepared for the unexpected and never show your fear. Even the bad moments can be good in the end. If everything worked perfect during your journey, if nothing wrong happened during your trip, you’ve only been in Florida. And that could be boring.”

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Get the books of Pablo Rey about Around the World in 10 Years @ Amazon.com and Kindle, or download the first adventures HERE.